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Tag Archives: Los Angeles

How to Avoid the Most Common Cycling Accidents

Road accident

Road accidentAs the cost of gasoline and the awareness about the damage of fossil fuels both increase, more and more people are deciding to use alternative modes of transportation. Given that Los Angeles benefits from bicycle-friendly weather all year long, bicycling is a common and a viable choice for UCLA students, staff and faculty.

However, many cyclists have to share the road with cars where there is no practical access to bike paths or protected lanes. This means potentially dangerous encounters with motor vehicles.

To avoid common cycling accidents, every vehicle operator should read about their state's official DMV handbook, whether they are on four or two wheels. Although cyclists do have to understand and comply with the same rules of the road as cars, they also have unique challenges. Being aware of and knowing how to avoid the three most common cycling accidents may save your life.

Right Cross Accidents

Right cross accidents occur when a cyclist, who has right of way, is struck Dangerous city traffic situationby a car exiting a side street, driveway or parking lot and attempting to turn right or left. This may also happen when a driver pulls out far enough to block the cyclist's path. This is usually caused by a driver failing to notice the cyclist coming from their left.

As a vehicle, a bicycle has full right of way when it is going straight along the side of a road. The driver, in this case, is failing to provide this right of way.

Avoiding this type of accident requires making yourself more visible to drivers. Adding a headlight to your bike or helmet and turning it on during the day is one effective measure. Wear bright colors (orange is the most noticeable color), and don't hesitate to wave, yell, use your bell, and make eye contact with drivers. Riding further to the left of the road, when possible, may also help prevent this accident.

Right Hook Accidents

Right hook accidents occur when a cyclist, riding to the right side of a car, is struck by the car attempting to turn right. In other words, the cyclist, going straight through an intersection, is hit by a car turning right at the same intersection. This can also happen when a driver deliberately overtakes a cyclist through an intersection, and then makes a right turn, wrongly assuming that they have driven a safe distance away from the bicycle.

You can avoid this type of accident by driving further left from the curb, which makes you more visible and more memorable to drivers. It can also give you headway for avoiding a collision. Pay attention to the turn signals of surrounding vehicles, and stay back if necessary.

Door Collisions

Door collisions—also called "the Door Prize"—happen when the driver of a parked car opens their door in the path of a cyclist. The cyclist, who didn't have enough notice to swerve or stop safely, collides with the open door. Door_zone_openThis is an error on the driver's part, not the cyclist, since cyclists have the same rights as cars. A parked car door opening in the way of another car would also be the parked driver's fault.

Cyclists can avoid this common accident by riding a safe distance away from parked cars. You should also pay attention to potential drivers sitting in parked cars; if you see someone there, you can swerve to the left to avoid the door potentially opening in your path.

In general, bicycle accidents happen because cyclists are smaller, and therefore less noticeable, than motor vehicles. Having a headlight turned on even during the day and wearing bright clothing are effective passive measures to increase your visibility to drivers.

 

 

New to UCLA? Here Are Some Transit-Friendly Neighborhoods

"Los Angeles, USA - June 30, 2011: The Metro Gold Line train bound for Sierra Madre Villa station and east Los Angeles County departs the Chinatown Station."

UCLA Transit Map 2017With the Expo Line extension opening last year and the ongoing Purple Line extension project, taking transit to UCLA has been never easier.

Whether you're a new student or new employee looking to move closer to campus, we've created a map to show what areas around Westwood are most accessible to bus or rail stations. From the Santa Monica Big Blue Bus (BBB) to Culver City Bus (CCB) to several Metro bus and rail lines, there are many direct transit routes coming into campus every day. As an added bonus, we've also included the median rent prices for one-bedroom, one-bathroom units to further guide you.

Plus, UCLA Transportation subsidizes transit passes for six different agencies. The BruinGO! Flash Pass for BBB and CCB, for example, only costs $33 per quarter. And as a public transit rider, you'll be able to join the Bruin Commuter Club for even more benefits, like discounted daily parking for when you need to drive in and four hours of free Zipcar usage every month.

Need help planning your commute? Contact our Bruin Commuter Services team at transportation@ts.ucla.edu or (310) 794-7433.

 

Top 7 Views in LA Accessible by Foot

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PIM2581[1]

Winters in Southern California are usually pretty perfect. The air is crisp and the skies are blue making it the perfect time of year for a nice, relaxing hike. So let your inner explorer run wild, and take some time off your busy winter quarter schedule to enjoy some of the best views Los Angeles has to offer. Here are seven of our favorite spots:

1. Runyon Canyon

Runyon Canyon Park, Los Angeles, USA

One thing's for sure: The deeper you go into the hills of LA, the better the view. That's why Runyon Canyon is at the top of our list. This landmark of a hiking trail is notorious for leaving all of its guests in complete awe. Runyon Canyon also has an off-leash dog park so you can bring all your furry friends on the journey!

2000 N Fuller Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 | (323) 666-5046 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

2. Yamashiro Restaurant

Another one of our favorites is Yamashiro Restaurant, located in the vibrant community of Hollywood. Besides its breathtaking backdrop, this popular Los Angeles eatery is known for having one of the most stunning environments in the entire city. Equipped with a pagoda, numerous ponds, beautiful gardens, some spectacular dishes, and a marvelous sunset that stretches above the LA metro area to an infinite sky, this spot will soon become the topic of all your conversations. Try your best to get a seat at table 8it’s the best view in the house!

1999 N Sycamore Ave., Hollywood, CA, 90068 | (323) 466-5125 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

3. Griffith Observatory

griffith-observatory[1]

Located in the Hollywood Hills just above the Los Feliz neighborhood, this iconic Los Angeles structure offers you one of the best views in town. The observatory provides you with a perfect Instagram worthy view of the Hollywood sign, Downtown LA and, on a clear day, even the Pacific Ocean! Not only do you get to experience a magnificent view, but you also get a chance to visit one of the best museums Los Angeles has to offer, at no cost! If you're up for a good hike, journey down the trail that starts from the Greek Theatre or Fern Dell toward the Observatory. During the weekends, LADOT offers a DASH Observatory Shuttle at a low cost.

2800 East Observatory Road, Los Angeles, CA 90027 | (213) 473-0800 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

4. OUE Skyspace LA

skyonfire-12-1

If you’d like a 360 degree view of LA, this is most definitely the place for you. The all-new OUE Skyspace LA, California’s tallest open-air observation deck, is located nearly 1,000 feet above the city in the iconic U.S. Bank Tower. The observation terraces cover a complete 2,800 square feet of outdoor space and feature glass balustrades that showcase its spectacular view as far as possible. For the true and honest dare devils, OUE Skyspace LA is also equipped with a “sky slide,” a 45-foot outdoor slide that wraps around the exterior of the tower! Now that’s a view, am I right?

633 West Fifth Street, Suite 840, Los Angeles, CA 9007 | (213) 894- 9000 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

5. Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook

This recently restored area offers a magnificent view of the Los Angeles basin, the Pacific Ocean and all of its surrounding mountains. Not only does it offer you an amazing scenic view, but it also offers a state-of-the-art visitor center. Baldwin Hills is a great opportunity to enjoy and connect with nature as it's overflowing with many seasonal native wildflowers. If you are looking for a good, fairly easy hike and a great workout, the park's main attraction is its steps, which will take only 20 minutes to climb to the top.

6300 Hetzler Rd., Culver City, CA 90232 | (310) 558-5547 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

6. Mount Hollywood

If you still find yourself wanting more amazing sights after your visit to the Griffith Observatory, then a hike up to Mount Hollywood is a definite must. Just head toward the Charlie Turner trail north of the Observatory parking lot and soon you will find yourself with a 360° spectacular view. You will be dazzled by many sights including the famous Hollywood sign, the Los Angeles basin, the San Gabriel Mountains, the San Fernando Valley and the Observatory itself! If you venture up on a clear day you might even be able to catch a sight of Catalina Island and the Pacific Ocean. This relatively short and easy hike is definitely a must-do.

2800 E Observatory Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90027 | (323) 913-4688 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

7. Barnsdall Art Park

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Located at the crest of Olive Hill and overlooking the city of Los Angeles, Barnsdall Art Park offers you a grand and unique view of Hollywood. Just an easy hike up the hill and you will find yourself reveling in a great view of the Hollywood sign and the Griffith Observatory. The park also offers several unique installments to visitors, including the Hollyhock house, the Los Angeles Municipal Art gallery and the Barnsdall Gallery theater. On certain days you can catch an outdoor screening of your favorite movie or participate in the many activities the park hosts, such as summer wine tastings, a farmer's market and several art classes. When you plan your visit, be sure to catch a view of the sunset from the top of the hill.

4800 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 | (323) 660-4254 | Directions via transit from UCLA

 

 

CicLAvia Event This Sunday, Oct. 16

commutergroupride

commutergrouprideAnother car-free day is coming to the heart of LA this Sunday, October 16. CicLAvia will be cruising through East LA, Little Tokyo, Chinatown, DTLA and MacArthur Park.

And if you don't have a bike, Metro Bike Share is conveniently available for those who want to join in on the fun. Find a bike share station near you with this map. Buy a bike share pass before the event and load it on a TAP card, or use your credit card to check out a bike at a kiosk at a rate of $3.50 for 30 minutes.

From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, streets will open only for cyclists, pedestrians, runners and skaters. For more information and to find a way to get there with Metro (expect street closures and delays if you are thinking of driving), click here.

ciclavia 2016 map

Where Does LA Rank in Walkable Cities?

Woman walking down the street.

Metro areas within the United States are either defined as central city/walkable urban or drivable suburban. Since the suburban sprawl of the 1950s, Americans have been leaving the central city or urban areas for the suburban ones. But according to a new study by the George Washington University School (GWU) of Business, where they ranked walkable urbanism in America's 30 largest metro areas, the end of sprawl is in sight and urban planning is now focusing on creating walkable development instead of drivable suburbs. Here's a closer look at the study defining walkability and finding out where Los Angeles ranked on the list.

What Makes a City Walkable?

A walkable urban development is comprised of four factors: higher development density, mixed-use real estate products, emerging "new" product types and multiple transportation options. The ratio of a building's gross floor area to the size of land which it's built on, or the FAR, is much higher in walkable areas with the ratio ranging between 1.0 and 4.0 compared to the 0.05 to 0.4 range in suburban areas. This means walkable areas make better use of space, building up rather than out and giving pedestrians the ability to cover more ground.

Walkable areas have mixed-use real estate where business and private homes co-mingle, unlike suburban areas where commercial and private properties are segregated. Think gated communities versus strip malls. While an urban area might have rental apartments over a grocery store, the suburbs don't promote "new" product types and everything is fairly standardized throughout the country. Lastly, while cars and trucks are the primary mode of transportation in the suburbs, walkable areas offer multiple options such as bus, train, metro, bicycle lanes and pedestrian-safe sidewalks.

Where Does Los Angeles Rank?

A good way behind the top six most walkable metro areas—New York City, Washington D.C., Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco—the Los Angeles metro region ranked #17 overall. The study by GWU identified 619 regionally important walkable urban spaces, also known as "WalkUPS," with Los Angeles housing 53 of these neighborhoods. More walkable cities have development momentum and house the most educated and wealthy, which, according to MoveLA, makes LA an anomaly. It's mid-level overall ranking is a result of five additional counties in the region being evaluated with LA county and potentially skewing scores.

Could Los Angeles Be Ranked Higher in the Future?

There is a general shift happening toward more walkable urban areas as seen by forward-looking indicators that consider rent premiums, absorption of individuals