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Bruin Bike Share Launches October 3!

BikeShare_Launch_Blog

BikeShare_Launch_BlogIt's lunch time and you’re meeting with friends for a bite in Westwood Village. You realize from your NextBus app that the bus won’t arrive for another 10 minutes. Walking will take even longer and driving is out of the question. Biking will take five minutes, but you don't have your bike with you. What do you do? UCLA Bruin Bike Share has got you covered.

Launching Tuesday, October 3, our campus bike-share system aims to address many types of scenarios such as this one in an effort to make our campus bike friendlier and more accessible by active modes of transportation. There will be 18 hub locations and 130 bikes throughout campus and in Westwood Village including Powell Library, Luskin Conference Center, and Broxton and Glendon Avenues in Westwood Village.Bruin Bike Share Map

Join us for the official launch celebration on October 3 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dickson Court North. There will be food, prizes, giveaways and an inaugural group ride for a limited number of participants.

As part of the launch, UCLA Transportation will be offering special founding annual membership rates to bike share users. UCLA employees and students can purchase a $60 annual plan for 90 minutes of usage per day. The founding public annual rate will be $69 a year. Additional plans include $7 a month for UCLA members, $25 a month for the public and a Pay-As-You-Go rate of $7 an hour for anyone.

UCLA students, staff and visitors will be able to check out bikes using their smart phones, membership cards or the payment kiosks at larger bike hubs. The first step is to create a Social Bicycles account by downloading the mobile app or visiting our website.

Students, staff, faculty and visitors alike will be able to take bikes from one designated hub to another. Bikes can be locked up to racks at any designated hub using the lock that comes with the bike, as well as to regular racks outside of hubs for a small fee.

In LA County, bike-share programs have launched in Westside cities like Santa Monica, Beverly Hills and West Hollywood. LA Metro has also expanded its bike share beyond Downtown LA to Pasadena, Venice and San Pedro.

For more information about Bruin Bike Share, go to our website.

 

How to Avoid the Most Common Cycling Accidents

Road accident

Road accidentAs the cost of gasoline and the awareness about the damage of fossil fuels both increase, more and more people are deciding to use alternative modes of transportation. Given that Los Angeles benefits from bicycle-friendly weather all year long, bicycling is a common and a viable choice for UCLA students, staff and faculty.

However, many cyclists have to share the road with cars where there is no practical access to bike paths or protected lanes. This means potentially dangerous encounters with motor vehicles.

To avoid common cycling accidents, every vehicle operator should read about their state's official DMV handbook, whether they are on four or two wheels. Although cyclists do have to understand and comply with the same rules of the road as cars, they also have unique challenges. Being aware of and knowing how to avoid the three most common cycling accidents may save your life.

Right Cross Accidents

Right cross accidents occur when a cyclist, who has right of way, is struck Dangerous city traffic situationby a car exiting a side street, driveway or parking lot and attempting to turn right or left. This may also happen when a driver pulls out far enough to block the cyclist's path. This is usually caused by a driver failing to notice the cyclist coming from their left.

As a vehicle, a bicycle has full right of way when it is going straight along the side of a road. The driver, in this case, is failing to provide this right of way.

Avoiding this type of accident requires making yourself more visible to drivers. Adding a headlight to your bike or helmet and turning it on during the day is one effective measure. Wear bright colors (orange is the most noticeable color), and don't hesitate to wave, yell, use your bell, and make eye contact with drivers. Riding further to the left of the road, when possible, may also help prevent this accident.

Right Hook Accidents

Right hook accidents occur when a cyclist, riding to the right side of a car, is struck by the car attempting to turn right. In other words, the cyclist, going straight through an intersection, is hit by a car turning right at the same intersection. This can also happen when a driver deliberately overtakes a cyclist through an intersection, and then makes a right turn, wrongly assuming that they have driven a safe distance away from the bicycle.

You can avoid this type of accident by driving further left from the curb, which makes you more visible and more memorable to drivers. It can also give you headway for avoiding a collision. Pay attention to the turn signals of surrounding vehicles, and stay back if necessary.

Door Collisions

Door collisions—also called "the Door Prize"—happen when the driver of a parked car opens their door in the path of a cyclist. The cyclist, who didn't have enough notice to swerve or stop safely, collides with the open door. Door_zone_openThis is an error on the driver's part, not the cyclist, since cyclists have the same rights as cars. A parked car door opening in the way of another car would also be the parked driver's fault.

Cyclists can avoid this common accident by riding a safe distance away from parked cars. You should also pay attention to potential drivers sitting in parked cars; if you see someone there, you can swerve to the left to avoid the door potentially opening in your path.

In general, bicycle accidents happen because cyclists are smaller, and therefore less noticeable, than motor vehicles. Having a headlight turned on even during the day and wearing bright clothing are effective passive measures to increase your visibility to drivers.

 

 

How to Change Your Bike’s Tire

He always gets the job done in time

He always gets the job done in timeFlat tires on your bike are always a frustrating thing to have to deal with. However, all of this can be avoided if you're adequately prepared. So grab your tools and follow these simple directions to get back on that road in no time.

Before we begin, make sure you have all the necessary tools: a spare tube, a pump, tire levers, spare tube, wedges, and rim tape.

Remove The Wheel

  1. We’ll begin by loosening the nuts that hold the axle to the frame. Use lubricant if you run into problems while trying to loosen them.
  2. Remove the wheel from the frame. If it's the rear tire, you will need to lift the chain clear of the gear cluster. For better instructions on how to do this, watch the video above for a step by step run down.
  3. Deflate the tube completely by pressing down on the small plunger located in the center of your tire/inner part of the valve.
  4. To remove the tire, use tire levers, or a similar object. With the first lever, pry the tire over the rim. Repeat process four inches away with a second lever, move lever around the rim to release the tire.
  5. Remove the wheel and tube completely - you may need to unscrew a small nut at the base of the valve stem to take out the inner tube.

Inspect, Repair, or Replace

  1. Make sure inspect the punctured tube thoroughly - check the outer surface of the tire for any signs or foreign objects (cuts, tears, etc.) that may have punctured your tire (make sure to also check the inner surface of the tire for similar damage).
  2. Wash up and dry up the damaged area (rubbing down the damaged surface with sandpaper will help the glue adhesive stick).
  3. Adjust patch and place over adhesive after removing all sharp/foreign objects from inside the tire casing. Replace the inner tube or tube and tire if damage is severe
  4. Before replacing, make sure to purchase the right tube and tire size. Measurements can be found on the old tire.

Replace Your Wheel

  1. We’ll begin by checking the tire wall for an arrow or similar symbol to indicate the direction of rotation - some tires have a "direction specific" tread pattern.
  2. Put one side in first, then ease the partially inflated tube into the tire and locate the valve. Make sure no part of the tube is sticking out.
  3. Starting at the tire edge closest to the valve, use your thumbs to work the other side of tire over the rim and into the well. You may need to use the levers to do the last bit and pop it back into the rim.
  4. Use your thumbs to ease the tire from the rim around the entire wheel, make sure the tire is not pinching any part of the tube. When you inflate the tube, if it's pinching, it will pop and you will have to start over.
  5. Inflate the tube slowly and carefully, while checking to make sure the tire is on evenly and nothing is "pinching."
  6. You’ve done it! Enjoy your ride!

 

[VIDEO] BruinBikeSmart SCAG Award

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bruinbikesmart_blog

FullSizeRenderUCLA Transportation was recently presented with a Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) award for our BruinBikeSmart citation diversion program, the first of its kind in LA county.

To celebrate this accomplishment, SCAG put together this video to highlight our BikeSmart program. Check it out!

Sustainability Awards 2017: UCLA from SCAG on Vimeo.

Have You Seen the New Bike Counter On Campus?

Bike-Counter-Westwood_blogheader

Bike-Counter-WestwoodThere’s some fresh number crunching going on at UCLA. The counting isn’t happening within the halls of the department of mathematics, but rather outdoors, near a tree-lined campus entry point. Just in time for National Bike Month, the University has added a second automated bike counter.

The new device is situated on Westwood Plaza, a main portal to campus. Surveys, bike parking counts and Los Angeles Bike Coalition records estimate there are currently 3,000 riders putting pedal to the metal around campus.

Across the nation, in cities with a similar urban geography to Los Angeles such as Seattle, Portland and Boston, bike counters are proving essential to building support and improving conditions for the cycling community. Planners use the bike circulation numbers to justify bike infrastructure. Bike citizens get to experience a rush seeing their pedaling presence instantaneously noted on streets crowded with personal vehicles, buses and pedestrians.

At UCLA, bikes count. Our original cyclist monitoring system—the first such device ever installed in Southern California—was fitted in 2013 on the southern side of

Bike counter on Strathmore Plaza

Bike counter on Strathmore Plaza

Strathmore Plaza. Manufactured by Eco Counter, the device works through sensors in the pavement calibrated to only be triggered by bikes, which produce an electromagnetic signature. That pulse is then reflected on a digital screen, providing real-time information, tallying and displaying the daily and annual number of riders who cycle by.

The University also has a Bike Master Plan, which outlines efforts to improve cycling conditions and promote bicycling as a transportation mode on, to and from campus. Policies and programs to support and accommodate bicycling include construction of more bikeways, a signage plan, improved bicycle parking, financial incentives for bicycle use, and safety and education classes.

Bike counts pave the way for a more bike-friendly campus. The tallies help determine travel patterns, track trends over time, evaluate the effectiveness of current efforts to promote this mode of transportation, assess demand and prioritize improvement projects.

The counters may be a small part of a larger active transportation initiative, but the figures they calculate provide valuable information about patterns of cycling that can inform decision-making.

“The latest bike counter is a powerful statement," said UCLA Active Transportation Planner Jimmy Tran. "For riders, it’s a dynamic visual recognition that bicycling is valued at UCLA. The more we invest in bike infrastructure around campus, the more people want to bike. It’s a balancing effect.”