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Tag Archives: BikeLA

California: More Bicycle Friendly Than Ever

A photo of a woman cycling near the Golden Gate Bridge

A photo of a woman cycling near the Golden Gate BridgeCalifornia continues to shift higher in its statewide efforts to improve conditions for cyclists. Two years ago, the League of American Bicyclists (LAB) ranked California as the eighth most Bicycle Friendly State℠ based on the amount and effectiveness of the state’s activities toward creating a safer and more welcoming space for bicyclists. California has now risen to number three in the national ranking.

California was recognized by LAB for getting more serious about biking and walking, citing the state’s first-ever bicycle and pedestrian plan being adopted three years after a report calling for radical reform at Caltrans. LAB’s Bicycle Friendly State Report Card said, “With a state DOT [Department of Transportation] that is increasingly committed to ensuring the safety and comfort of people who bike rather than maintaining a status quo, the state seems on the verge of establishing new standards and practices that will be a model for other states, both through its size and its efforts. In particular, watch for California’s actions on bicycle-related data including facilities, crashes, and counts to be potential models for other states.”

Another key factor in the leap in ranking cited by Streetsblog California “is the increase in funding for the Active Transportation Program, S.B. 1, the new gas tax, almost doubled the size of that program, from $130 million to $230 million annually. This is still a puny portion of the state’s overall transportation budget, but nevertheless California is doing better than most states: the League ranks California sixth out of the fifty states in terms of dedicated bicycle funding.”

There is still much work to be done in order to make California a safer place to bike and walk. A larger emphasis on data research, a repeal of California’s mandatory bike lane law, and the general establishment of safer, more inclusive infrastructure are some of the ways California can try to nab that number-one spot next time!

Just as our state has become more bicycle friendly, you may recall UCLA in recent years has moved up in its ranking as a Bicycle Friendly University.

For more information about how California got to where it is now and where it’s going in the future, check out this article. Let’s keep going, California!

 

PHOTOS: Bike Recycling Day 2017

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IMG_7854_blogheaderWe kept the chain alive at this year's Bike Recycling Day! About 100 UCLA staff, faculty and students showed up to claim a used bike or bike parts for free!

Check out some photos from last week's event below. The full album is on our Facebook page.

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The 7th Annual Bike Recycling Day is Almost Here!

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Blog 2017Bike Recycling Day is back and set for Sunday, November 5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the rooftop of Parking Structure 8! As always, you will have the opportunity to receive used bikes or used bike parts for FREE.

For those new to UCLA, Bike Recycling Day is our popular annual event where UCLA Transportation gives abandoned bikes and bike parts (as-is) to members of the UCLA community.

Some of the bikes may need a light tune-up and others are stripped down to their frame. Recycled bike frames offer an excellent opportunity for those interested in building their own bike from the ground up or to replace a broken part on their own bike.

Participation is based on a random lottery being held by UCLA Transportation. The registration process will reduce chaos and tent pitching, while helping to create an equal opportunity at cashing in on a free ride! The lottery will close on Tuesday, October 31 at 9 a.m.

Eligibility guidelines:

  • ONLY UCLA students, staff and faculty members with BruinCards may participate. You must display your BruinCard and lottery ticket number to claim a bike.
  • Lottery numbers will be distributed via email on Tuesday, Oct. 31.
  • Limit ONE bike (or parts that total one bike) per person.
  • Bikes will be offered in ascending order starting promptly at 10 a.m. If you are not present when your number is called you will be passed.

Bike technicians from the UCLA Bike Shop will be on-site to answer your questions regarding your new find.


*Terms & Agreements

How to Avoid the Most Common Cycling Accidents

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Road accidentAs the cost of gasoline and the awareness about the damage of fossil fuels both increase, more and more people are deciding to use alternative modes of transportation. Given that Los Angeles benefits from bicycle-friendly weather all year long, bicycling is a common and a viable choice for UCLA students, staff and faculty.

However, many cyclists have to share the road with cars where there is no practical access to bike paths or protected lanes. This means potentially dangerous encounters with motor vehicles.

To avoid common cycling accidents, every vehicle operator should read about their state's official DMV handbook, whether they are on four or two wheels. Although cyclists do have to understand and comply with the same rules of the road as cars, they also have unique challenges. Being aware of and knowing how to avoid the three most common cycling accidents may save your life.

Right Cross Accidents

Right cross accidents occur when a cyclist, who has right of way, is struck Dangerous city traffic situationby a car exiting a side street, driveway or parking lot and attempting to turn right or left. This may also happen when a driver pulls out far enough to block the cyclist's path. This is usually caused by a driver failing to notice the cyclist coming from their left.

As a vehicle, a bicycle has full right of way when it is going straight along the side of a road. The driver, in this case, is failing to provide this right of way.

Avoiding this type of accident requires making yourself more visible to drivers. Adding a headlight to your bike or helmet and turning it on during the day is one effective measure. Wear bright colors (orange is the most noticeable color), and don't hesitate to wave, yell, use your bell, and make eye contact with drivers. Riding further to the left of the road, when possible, may also help prevent this accident.

Right Hook Accidents

Right hook accidents occur when a cyclist, riding to the right side of a car, is struck by the car attempting to turn right. In other words, the cyclist, going straight through an intersection, is hit by a car turning right at the same intersection. This can also happen when a driver deliberately overtakes a cyclist through an intersection, and then makes a right turn, wrongly assuming that they have driven a safe distance away from the bicycle.

You can avoid this type of accident by driving further left from the curb, which makes you more visible and more memorable to drivers. It can also give you headway for avoiding a collision. Pay attention to the turn signals of surrounding vehicles, and stay back if necessary.

Door Collisions

Door collisions—also called "the Door Prize"—happen when the driver of a parked car opens their door in the path of a cyclist. The cyclist, who didn't have enough notice to swerve or stop safely, collides with the open door. Door_zone_openThis is an error on the driver's part, not the cyclist, since cyclists have the same rights as cars. A parked car door opening in the way of another car would also be the parked driver's fault.

Cyclists can avoid this common accident by riding a safe distance away from parked cars. You should also pay attention to potential drivers sitting in parked cars; if you see someone there, you can swerve to the left to avoid the door potentially opening in your path.

In general, bicycle accidents happen because cyclists are smaller, and therefore less noticeable, than motor vehicles. Having a headlight turned on even during the day and wearing bright clothing are effective passive measures to increase your visibility to drivers.

 

 

Bike Essentials 101

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Paige Colton commutes to UCLA by bike from Santa Monica near 26th Street and Wilshire Boulevard. Paige, who is working toward her Masters in Urban and Regional Planning, knows all about the benefits of bicycling.

"I love the sense of freedom biking gives me," she says. "I can move way faster than a car stuck in traffic, feel the wind in my hair, and squeeze some exercise into a busy day!"

In honor of Bike Week, she has provided us with a snapshot of her biking essentials. Take a look below:

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Items pictured: water bottle, reflective windbreaker, helmet, coffee mug, front and back lights, keys, sunglasses, U-lock, a notebook, pens, cell phone, backpack, bike shorts and bus fare.